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, this was very important for us to stay in positive risk environment. >> hans, we're seeing the response to the upside now. second highs, 1.32. are you sticking by your thoughts that it is still heading towards 1.30? >> we have to make it clear that in the next quarter or two the euro has upside potential and not downside potential. then the longer prospect for the euro is still very swb very negative. why is this euro overshoot taking place? it has a lot to do with the increasing negative correlation with the yen. so the euro is the anti-yen. that implies that when we were seeing the yen coming under selling pressure, japanese investors, where are they currently investing? investors are investing in fixed income. in many cases, very little yields left so that actually means the peripheral of europe sticks out. you need to have some preconditions. the most important, the yen has to stay weak, but secondly we should not run into any politically motivated problem with the euro. that would be a killer for that type of trade. >> and on that note, the european commission today is due to relea
in sabine joining us on the telephone from italy. what more could you tell us on this announcement the pope will be resigning february 28? >> it appears the pope made the announcement himself but the information is very, very sketchy. of course, this is really big news. having a poker resign is something we have not seen for hundreds and hundreds of years. it appears the pope gave the announcement in latin. that is all we have a moment. we are obviously going to be following this story very closely indeed to see how things develop. >> i understand information just coming in, and very scarce at the moment. but any idea as to why he is going to resign? and why he has made this announcement? >> at the moment, we have no idea of whatsoever why he decided to resign and why he made the announcement at this time. we do not know if it has anything to do with problems he may have to do with his help. whether -- health. whether he believes the time has come for somebody else to replace him. whether there are some interior motives within the church hierarchy for this. at the moment, no motivation what
amanpour joins us from rome. this report was in "the observer," the newspaper, saying one man was a 20-year-old seminarien, cardinal was a spiritual director and inappropriate approaches were made after night prayers. what do you know about the case and what cardinal o'brien is saying? >> reporter: well, look, we know according to published reports there's this case and three other cases. a total of four cases now coming out and accusing cardinal o'brien of inappropriate sexual misconduct. he himself is said to have taken up, obviously, legal counsel. he has, as we've said, resigned but he was resigning months ago. it's just that today pope benedict accepted that resignation. he didn't have to accept it today. it could have been further delayed but he did accept the resignation. and now we've also know, because of statements cardinal o'brien has posted, he will not come here to rome and take part in the election of the next pope in the conclave. he said that he would want the spotlight not to be on him but on the pope. but what is clear, suzanne and michael, is that, look, the sun is settin
republicans will finally allow a vote on the nomination of robert bacharach to the u.s. court of appeals for the tenth circuit. because of this filibuster, something that stopped robert bacharach way last year, a man who came out of the senate judiciary committee unanimously, all democrats, all republicans voting for him, the people of oklahoma, colorado, kansas, new mexico, utah and wyoming have been needlessly denied his services as a tenth circuit judge for seven months. now, the judicial vacancies have again risen to almost 90. we have dozens of judges that get blocked for month after month after month, and then the republicans finally allow a vote on it, it passed with 90 votes or 95 votes or 100 votes, but every time that happens, the federal courts have diminished. every time that's happened, aside from the fact that the people of america wonder what in heaven's name we're doing in this body, anything as foolish as that, but the courts, the federal courts are supposed to be so impartial and outside of politics, they appear to be mixed up in politics. how does anybody, from any of
you exactly where it is, what it's carrying, while using less fuel. delivering whatever the world needs, when it needs it. ♪ after all, what's the point of talking if you don't have something important to say? ♪ >>> you voted and said simon baker. >> the british accent. that's what it is. >> at least it's not the hair style. >> i don't argue with people with british accents as a rule. i think most people agree. >> oracle, i like it. >> joe? >> igt, off the casino comments. >> josh brown. >> don't sleep on this thing. >> a good trade, 8% up. >> have a great day. interesting, three hours until the market closes. see you tomorrow. >> and scott teed it up perfectly for us. a fascinate is hour here on the east coast. it is still election day in italy. now fearing gridlock, coming to rome, forcing a drop in the italian market. there you see the little slide, not so little, at the italian market. it sort of trickled over into the u.s. markets. as we countdown to march 1st deadline day for massive spending cuts out of washington. the dow was less than a hundred point from an all-time
-hour -- >> in his state of the union address, u.s. president barack obama proposes fresh negotiations on a transatlantic free trade agreement. >> pope benedict celebrates his last public mass as pontiff inside st. peter's basilica in rome. >> and the movie "night train to lisbon" has its world premiere at the berlin film festival. president barack obama says the american economy has made important progress, but there is still a long way to go. he delivered the annual state of the union address in washington last night and urged americans to help jump-start the country's sluggish -- sluggish economy. >> pushing hard for a special economy would significant job growth. that looks like the message obama plans to hammer home time and time again during his time in office. >> presidents also touched on foreign policy, praising u.s. soldiers stationed in afghanistan and promising them a speedy return home. >> the president of the united states. [applause] >> it is a washington ritual, long applause, handshakes, and hugs on both sides of the aisle. in his speech, obama focused clearly on domes
will dramatically -- he will not be creating a food that is in front of you anymore. these are simple ways for us to nudge the biology of blubber and the right direction. sedentary lifestyle? if you sit -- your mortality rates increase is 11%. it is important because it avoids frailty. if i got rid of all the can see in america, we would live in average of 2.8 years longer. that is it. a little more than two years longer. what kills people is not the cancer, it is there too frail to whether the treatment or recover after word spread same for heart disease. we go around the world where people live a long time. what do you do about it? you have to push yourself. look in the wild. when you do not push yourself, you end up with a bony problems. osteoporosis. you have medications for it, but they are expensive. they do not work as well as resistance training. getting people to recognize it means reminding them what they used to do. here is a cheetah chasing its prey. watch what happens. ask yourself -- when was the last time you went at full speed? when was the last time you gave it everything you had
the altar on a moving platform, so he doesn't have to walk down the long aisle. sometimes he using a cane. his brothers says the doctors told hi not to take any more transatlantic trips. >>> he is also an nbc vattian analyst. george, good to see you. you and i are in somewhat frequent contact, as you send out notes about what's going on, but did anybody really see this coming? i nope he's talked about the possibility of retirement, but now? >> i was going to say, chris, it's an unexpected pleasure to see you today. this is a surprise to timing, not to fact. the pope has indicated on several previous indications if he ever came to the decision in prayer and conscience he could not give the service the church deserved, he would leave, not stand on his ego or stand on ceremony. he would clear the path for a new pope. the timing is a bit surprising, but when it happens in 719 years, it's always going to be surprising. >> you know what i thought, george, i thought he must -- do you think he's slowing down or he's really not well? >> i saw the pope in december shortly after he made six new card
. "we must trust in the mighty power of god's mercy. we are all sinners, but his grace transforms us and makes us new." just ahead, benedict's health, his replacement, and what's next for the catholic church. "newsroom" starts now. >>> good morning. thank you so much for joining me. i'm carol costello. we begin with a bombshell greeting 1 billion catholics around the world. their spiritual leader, pope benedict xvi stepping down at the end of the month. we're bringing you all the angles of this developing story. joining me now for this hour's special coverage, chris cuomo, he's in new york. >> good morning, carol. great to joining here. >>> shocking news because this simply hasn't been done. it's been almost 600 years since a pope resigned. it was gregory xii. it was to end the civil war. the question becomes why is pope benedict doing this now? we're going to get reaction first because no one saw this coming, certainly in this country. let's start off our coverage with deb feyerick in st. patrick's cathedral in new york city, the center of the american catholic tradition here. deb,
us today, everybody. i'm fresh out of time. but "around the world" is next. >>> i'm suzanne malveaux. >> i'm michael holmes. >> welcome to "around the world." egypt, a freak accident, hot air balloon explodes in the a plummets to the ground, 18 people dead. a live report. >>> vatican city, learning more about the future and what it holds for pope benedict xvi, final week cloud by scandal. >> the dow rallying from yesterday's big loss but not so for world markets. italy's election causing uncertainty. the government, europe's third largest economy, facing a deadlock. >>> egypt, tourists flying high above ancient egyptian sites plunging to their deaths when a hot air balloon explodes and crashes. >> 18 people have died. the local government has banned all other hot air balloon flights for now. it happened in luxor. the latest on the investigation. >> ian, let's start with what the theory is at the moment. there are reports of a gas cylinder exploding. describe what you've heard. >> reporter: well, michael, that's exactly what ware we're hearing. an the 1,000 feet a gas canister on the
sponsored by the u.s. postal service, he was in essence defrauding the government because the postal service requires everybody who works for it not to use any illegal drugs, and armstrong, landis claims, was, in fact, blood doping and using hormones chshgs are both forbidden by the fewer defrance and they claim by the postal service itself. it's a civil lawsuit claiming that he cheated the government and, of course, the u.s. postal service paid millions of dollars to sponsor the tour de france teams on which lance armstrong raced and, of course, won. now, metro detroit landis has already admitted cheating, but he says in the lawsuit that's how he knew what lance armstrong was up to. now, it's not a slam dunk, andrea, because, first of all, there's a question of how long ago this happened and whether you can still sue over it now. there's also a question of whether armstrong explicitly signed a contract with the postal service which would have forbidden him to do it, or whether it was a more general contract. his lawyers also say that they tried for weeks to settle this or work a resolution
moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the federal government moved another day closer today to $85 billion in automatic spending cuts. and as political charges and counter-charges flew, federal reserve chief ben bernanke raised new fears about the potential economic fallout. the fed chairman told a senate committee that forcing across-the-board spending cuts could slice half a percentage point off economic growth. >> i think an appropriate balance would be to introduce these cuts more gradually and to compensate with larger and more sustained cuts in the longer run to address our long-run fiscal issues. >> ifill: bernanke said the sequester was supposed to be a doomsday weapon
>>> and that concludes this edition of "newsli." tokyo.erine kobayashi in thanks for joining us. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> ifill: federal reserve chairman ben bernanke warned lawmakers today that the automatic spending cuts set to take effect friday will hurt the economic recovery. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, we examine the battle over those cuts, and how the paralysis in washington could affect hiring, investment, and more. >> ifill: then, we get the latest on the senate vote to confirm former senator chuck hagel as the next secretary of defense. >> woodruff: ray suarez talks with marcia coyle about today's supreme court arguments over getting a d.n.a. sample from a suspect who was arrested but not convicted of a crime. >> ifill: special correspondent kira kay previews next week's presidential contest in kenya, where memories linger from the violence that followed the 2007 elections. >> we talk about people dead. i think if you count it over time and those who don't know it's probably aro
four days before automatic budget cuts, the sequester, the new secretary of state tries to reassure u.s. embassy employees. >> i will do everything in my power to go to capitol hill and persuade my colleagues of the vitality, criticality of everything we're doing here. >> in washington president obama is increasing the pressure speaking just now to the nation's governors. >> here's the thing. these cuts do not have to happen. congress can turn them off any time with just a little bit of compromise. >> this weekend republican governors had their say. >> the uncertainty of sequestration is really harming our states and our national economy. >> the sequester was put in place to be a hammer, not a policy, and now here we are just a week away. find another way to do it, and get it done now. >> arizona. we have raphion there. it's going to cut a lot of jobs. >> vatican intrigue. new controversy surface as the pope permits an earlier start for the conclave to choose his successor. and the oscar goes to ben affleck. scoring gold with "argo" as first lady michelle obama stuns with a surprise spe
. john joins us live from beijing. this will be a key test for the new chinese leadership, is it not? >> i am looking at the statement from the chinese foreign ministry and it is pretty strong in word with regards to this regard of the common opposition to the international community, accounting itself amongst other nations opposed to this, the u.s. in particular, of course, saying that the chinese government is particularly opposed to this act. i think that what is important is to note that china's reason for opposing the action are very different from those in the west -- in the west, where political and moral considerations often come into play, china is less squeamish about totalitarianism or political prison camps, for example. what they fear most is instability, which is why they have been opposed to this nuclear test and why their statements are as strongly worded as they are. china is once again likely to impact any sanctions. they may support a toughening of sanctions on military issues and the exports of luxury goods, but they are not likely to want to do anything that brin
of the u.s. drone program. with lawmakers in both parties and even former secretary gates getting behind the creation of a oversight court on drones similar to what is done on eaves dropping. >> it is making me uncomfortable that the president or whoever it is the pros ecutor, the judge ad the jury and the executioner all rolled into one. >> the president, a politician, and republican or democrat should not decide someone's death by flipping through the flashcards and saying, do you want to kill him? >> we will hold hearings to work on this element of how to mesh the constitutional principles and values with the new mode of war. >> i think that some check on the ability of a president to do this has merit as we look to the longer term future. >> and now the breaking news out of rome, and the vatican. pope benedict the xvith is abdicating at the end of the month. the pope says he has no longer the strength to fulfill the dutes of the office. the 85-year-old pontiff of a leader of more than 1 billion catholics worldwide is the first to resign in 600 years. it is is a move that surprised ev
. howard, will you dot honors? [applause] >> u.s. senator, vice president of the united states, nobel peace prize recipient, as cor winner, best selling author, any one of these superlatives alone would be enough to suggest that our next speaker is a force with which to be reckoned, but when combined into one individual, it is evident that al gore is a force of nature. he is always been on the leading edge of promoting the internet as a tool for greater communication, of climate change as one of the greatest perils of our time, and in his latest book, "the future," of the key medical technological, and philosophical drivers checking our world. ever the big picture thinker, al gore explores how we may harness these epic change agents for the good. although his public professionalized had it not been without controversy, his record of accomplishments speak to the life lived on the precipice of passion, purpose, and possibility. on behalf of the savannah book festival, it is by great honor to introduce to all of you al gore. [applause] [cheers and applause] >> thank you very much, thank you. t
today. courtney reagan will be joining us with a preview in just a few minutes. then we'll bring you walmart's quarterly results the second they hit the tape. along with complete analysis and reaction from the street and, of course, you can't talk about the consumer without talking about energy prices. and rising gasoline costs at the pump, we've been watching everything that happens with oil prices moving higher. yesterday they actually sold off, but that is not much relief to those who have been paying higher price e at the pump for the last month. joining us in the next hour, oil man boone pickens. so the economy is at the top of the hour. andrew will get you up to speed on the day's other headlines. >> hedge fund manager david einhorn is taking his apple campaign directly to shareholders. he's going to be hosting a conference call today to argue the merits of distributing hedging preferred stock which, of course, is what this big debate is about. einhorn is battling and seeking an injunction next week to abolish a system for issuing preferred stock. i got a letter overnight from
along with joe kernen and andrew ross sorkin. we're watching the u.s. equity futures at this hour and right now it looks like there are some green arrows. you can see dow futures up by about 50 points in fair value. s&p up by just about 7. joe mentioned the oscars. he was very excited about this. if you went to bed early, here is a recap of the major winners. "argo"'s win as best picture marks the first time since "driving miss daisy" that a film won top prize without its director being nominated. ang lee was best director for "life of pi." three other wins for "life of pi" came for original score, sen ma effects and cinematography. >>> daniel day-lewis took home best actor for his role as lincoln. >>> the best actress went to jennifer lawrence for "silver lining's playbook." and best supporting actress was ann hathaway for les miserables. >>> randall stephenson will be joining us live in about ten minutes. the big news on his company today, gm is switching to at&t from verizon for on-star wireless service. that's beginning with the cars they make in 2015. >>> plus, we have a busy
have from them, that video. >> reporter: the u.s. embassy of peru has told them the pair may have then boarded a boat. >> the embase embassy believes they got on the boat for an a . amazon cruise. >> reporter: the family has set up a war room where they're mapping out all they know. >> probably the biggest thing we have access to garrett's bank records and starting january 25th all of his banking ceased. no more withdrawals. there's nothing. there is absolutely no activity. >> reporter: what has the family especially worried, warnings that kidnappers may be targeting american tourists in the peru region. friends and family are pleading for help. >> i want my son to know that i love him, that we all love him. we want them to come home safe and sound. >> when your child is missing it's really, really tough. and we need your help. >> reporter: the family tells me they're getting daily updates from the embassy in peru. they are certainly hoping that those images will lead to the couple. meanwhile, the folks here at the peddler bike shop are asking for the safe return of jamie neal an
to u.s. national security and to international peace and security. north korea has been warning for weeks that it was about to test its nuclear arsenal. on tuesday morning, it exploded a bomb in a facility one kilometer underground near the same location of its nuclear test in 2006 and 2009. >> there is concern that they could come up with a delivery system for their nuclear weapons. >> reporter: last week the u.s. and south korean navies launched military drills in the region as a show of force. north korea's test demonstrates a significant split from its main patron, china. recently beijing warned leader kim jong-un against any weapons tests. >> they've said publicly that there would be real consequences for north korea. what those consequences are we have to see, but i suspect it's going to be more than an angry lettered. >> reporter: china is one of the few countries supporting north korea's fragile economy and could respond by cutting financial aid. this latest test may provide evidence of the strength of north korea's nuclear arsenal. >> if this is a uranium enrichment tes
, with all of this going on, all of this looming, the u.s. senate made a point of reading george washington's farewell address to the chamber today. something they do every year. but, of course, this is no ordinary time, and to the white house we go. nbc's peter alexander standing by there. peter, good evening. >> reporter: brian, good evening to you. there is bipartisan agreement on one thing, that those sequester cuts will likely go ahead as planned at the end of this week. the white house in congressional republicans have made no progress toward a deal. while there was plenty of talking today, almost all of it was critical of the other side. the latest in the parade of public aofficials issuing dire warnings, homeland security secretary janet napolitano asked if the cuts would increase the likelihood of a terrorist attack. >> we're going to do everything we can to minimize that risk but the sequester makes it awfully, awfully tough. >> reporter: house speaker john boehner. >> if the president was serious, he would sit down with harry reid and begin to address our problems. >> reporter: t
the senses. >> alisyn: u.s. history is coming to the california coastguard just in time for valentine's day. a giant statue inspired by this world war 2 photo of a sailorki. it's being installed on the san diego waterfront. the statue will be dedicated on friday. studio "b" live from rome with shepard smith starts right now. >> shep: it's 3:00 on the east coast and noon on the west coast and 9:00 p.m. on a gorgeous night one day after the stunning announcement that the pope is stepping down. today, we're learning much more about his health approximate, carefully guarded secret until now. the vatican reveals that pope benedict has pacemaker in his heart long before being elected as pope back in 2005. months ago, we now know he had surgery to replace the pacemaker batteries, an operation that was conducted in absolute secrecy. vatican says it was routine. the shock waves continue to reverberate for catholics around the world and a lot of folks seem to have the same reaction, even if it's something the world hasn't seen in six centuries. >> i shows what a truly humble servant. he loved our chu
armstrong. now the u.s. government is on his case. and one week left medical the budget ax falls. today it is transportation secretary ray la hood's turn to warn about the sec kwster's deep impact. >> this is going to happen sfwloosh clarify why -- it's the matter of mileage between -- >> because we're going to reduce the number of controllers which will reduce their ability to guide planes in and out of airports. >> republicans say that's just scare tactics. >> the president is making stuff up. he puts law enforcement -- he puts firemen and policemen who 98% of them are being paid for with your local taxes and says you're going to lose your local policeman because of this. it's not true. >> and countdown to the oscars. we'll talk to the man behind the mom natured documentary five broken cameras about the conflict in the west bank. >> good day. i'm andrea mitchell live in washington where we have breaking news from the justice department now, which is joining a lawsuit by a former teammate against lance armstrong. nbc justice correspondent pete williams jones me now from the newsroom. h
, not just a rule by the court nor a rule of thumb judges use. the congress wrote a law in the clinton administration, president clinton signed it and that's the standard used. how do they decide whether they were negligent or gross negligence. what's the difference? easy example. you drive your car 40 miles an hour in a 25 miles an hour zone. that's negligence. you drive your car 830 miles an hour in -- 80 miles an hour in a 25 miles an hour, that's gross negligence. it has to do with how much you avoided the duty you have to preserve the asset and keep the people that work for you and the property around you safe. >> shepard: more closely tied example might be if you were trying to save money but didn't realize where you were skimping was a problem that might cost lives, that's one thing. if you saw problems, we know the rules, we're breaking the rules to save money, that's gross. >> that would be gross negligence. >> shepard: the argument has been made in the criminal trial suggesting that's what happened. >> i don't know which way the judge will go but i now how he's going to decid
, the daytona 500, even run tomorrow? but to start us off tonight, we have new incredible video of today's fiery crash. we take you right into the stands, in the middle of the chaos. watch. and here's how it all started. the multi-car smash-up happened seconds before the checkered flag at today's nationwide series race. the cars were packed tonight jostling for position racing at the top of their speed. they got tangled up. the collision sent kyle larson's 32 car hurtling toward the fence that's supposed to protect the fans. some crashing through and over that fence. 14 people were taken to hospitals. frantic repairs to the track are going on right now as we speak. we'll update you on this story throughout the hour tonight. nascar reacted immediately to the crash. i talked with driver brad keselowski just moments after it happened. at that point, he didn't know about the injuries. we now know 28 people were hurt, two critically. brad tells us what happens from a race car driver's perspective. >> i think you look at the wreck. there was a battle for the lead. i was driving the 22 car. and there w
by the news. >> you are joking. the pope? oh, my god. >> i'm so shocked. he has been such a short time with us. >> joseph was born into a catholic family in germany and was forced into the hitler youth. he was brought up as a theologian. he became more conservative in the 1960's. it was as a traditionalist that he became the doctrinal watchdog for john paul ii. the people who met the pope said that he was shy and charming. his most important writings dealt with things such as the importance of love. >> he is the most intelligent, intelligent,pope we have had in years. his sermons and harmonies are beautiful. >> he warned that excluding christianity from national debate could be harmful for democracy. by the time pope benedict came to westminster cathedral, he renewed respect for his argument that religion should stay at the heart of public life. over the last few years, catholicism has grown in the developing world. in its birthplace of europe, he has found the tides of secularism, all but impossible to stem. the pope defended moslems by quoting historical criticisms of it is lomb. -- islam. h
along with joe kernen and andrew ross sorkin. keeping an eye on the u.s. equity foourchs, well, after a couple of days of declines, dow futures are up significantly this morning. that's a gain of 50 points above fair value. the s&p 500 is opening up by about 6 points and this comes after two days of declines and a lot of questions about whether this rally has tapped out, at least for the moment. among the key market drivers this week, the fed and the conversation continues today. boston fed president eric rosengren and fed governor jerome powell will be speaking at a forum in new york. you don't have to wait until then to get inside scoop on the central bank. james bullard will be our special ges guest, with us starting at 7:00 a.m. eastern time, and this is huge given all the news from the fed this week and all the questions the market has been asking. the two-days of declines we've seen in the markets has pretty much all been blamed on the markets that we got a couple of days ago. we will talk to jim about everything that was happening inside the room and try to get his take to wher
no, and major garrett is at the white house to sort it all out for us. >> reporter: president obama continued to warn today that budget cuts could do real economic damage but was candid about when people would notice. >> these impacts will not all be felt on day one. but rest assured, the uncertainty is already having an affect. companies are preparing layoff notices. families are preparing to cut back on expenses. and the longer these cuts are in place, the bigger the impact will become. >> reporter: one republican governor, nikki haley of south carolina, said cutting federal spending without jeopardizing key services is so easy even her two children could do it. >> how many more times are we going to have to deal with these issues over and over again because of the finger pointing and the blame game that keeps on happening in washington? what i will tell you is, we heard today a whole lot of no. >> reporter: mr. obama has endorsed a senate democratic bill that seeks higher taxes on millionaires and unspecified cuts to defense and farm programs. house speaker john boehnor afternoon
us for not leaning in, giving us a whole new laundry list of areas where we need to improve and adds attending lean-in circles to our to-do list. by the way, i wrote most of this rant from home after putting my daughter to bed before coming back to the studio. so how is that for productive. >> crystal, we salute you for doing both so well. it's thursday, february 28th, and john boehner doesn't to negotiate with anyone. or so he thinks. ♪ >> rise up, o god, and save us from ourselves. >> senator obama or president obama and senate democrats are demanding more tax hikes. >> this is going to be a big hit on the economy. >> didn't john boehner say he wasn't going to do that anymore. >> revenue issue is now closed. gee said he wasn't going to sit down and negotiate. >> it was said very clearly you will regret doing this. >> our lives are in danger. >> it looks to me like woodward hyped that claim. >> it's not even noon on thursday and the house is going home. >> i think it was winston churchill who said americans always do the right thing after they've exhausted every other possibility
of the church. >> i appreciated the word father smith used, retiring. when you can't do the job, hand it over. >> retiring is something we have never thought of but his retirement years, vatican says he will be moved in the vatican owned villa, a monastery where crews are working on renovations. a handful of people at the vatican knew it was going to be the pope's new home. and then most likely the bishop of rome emeritus, retired bishop of rome. it's not clear whether he will go back to benedict or go back to joseph. another bolt from the blue, lightning struck the dome of st. petersburg basilica. much more live from rome a little bit later coming up on studio "b." >> shep: north korea claims it has followed through on a third nuclear test, first in four years or just about four. the rogue nation's leaders have made it clear they have set their sights on the united states. north korea reported this latest test is direct response to the reckless hostility of the united states. last month, defense ministers calmed the u.s. their prime target for nuclear tests and long-range missile launch but
to stop campaigning and come back to the table and work with us. we care about what happens to this economy and the people who sent us here. we have proffered alternatives and solutions. we don't adhere or agree with this false choice the president's putting forward. and as cathy said, president's off campaigning in my state in newport news, virginia. yes, we're very, very concerned about the impact on the commonwealth as we are on all states. there's a way to effect the right changes and reforms so we can avoid that. and we must set aside the false choice the president is proffering. >> as the other leaders have said, the president's only -- >> all right, so that's kevin mccarthy right now. that was eric cantor before that, the speaker. doesn't look like they're putting forward a new initiative to try to break the stalemate. he's referring to legislation that members of the house, the majority, passed last -- in the last session of congress. but that legislation is not -- does not spill over into this new session of congress, if congress is going to want to take up new legi
and their partners. all joining us live. be ready to be surprised by who is ready to rumba in the ballroom. >>> and good morning, america. hello to lara and sam, up early again, out in l.a. this morning. just about an hour, we're going to have that live announcement on "dancing with the stars." stay around for that. robin getting some rest after the oscars. we're looking forward to sharing her interview with michelle obama. great to have elizabeth vargas here. >> great to have you both back from los angeles. >>> we're going to have details on the crash coming in and on the monster blizzard, that sam was talking about. we're going to get that from him just ahead. it's been hitting throughout the northwest. some major developments overnight. >>> we're going to start with josh and the balloon air crash in egypt. quite a few people dead. >> right along the nile. this breaking overnight. 18 foreign tourists killed when a hot air balloon exploded and plummeted to the ground during an egypt tourist mecca of luxor, along the banks of the nile. witnesses are describing the terrifying moments as peo
. and this morning he's going to talk to us about his latest, "invisible armies." with that, turn it over to you, max. [applause] >> thank you very much, steve, for that warm and generous introduction, and thank you also for your many years of service, and i see a lot of folks who are either current and active duty or retired military, and i thank all of you for your years of service to the nation. what i'm here to talk about today is the contents of my new book, which as steve mentioned, is a history of ger guerrilla warfare. and although it may seem thick and daunting at first glance, i did try to tell a good story. it sort of encapsulated 5,000 years of guerrilla warfare history into one book. now, that may seem like a formidable undertaking, but here today in front of your very eyes, i'm going to do something that is even harder; i'm going to try to encapsulate the entire book into about a 25-minute talk. [laughter] so that's going to work out to about 200 years per minute. sofassen your -- sofassen your seat belts, we're going to go on a historical journey here. i'm going to talk about the origi
afternoon. welcome to the heritage foundation and to our auditorium. please welcome those are joining us on all of these occasions honor heritage.org website, for those inside -- in the house. please make sure cell phones are turned off. we will post the program within 24 hours honor heritage home page for your further reference as well. hosting where the debate is doctor bucci, director of our center for foreign policy studies. he previously served heritage a senior research fellow for defense and homeland security. is well-versed in the special area operations and cybersecurity areas as well as defense support to civil authorities. he served for three decades as an army special forces officer in july 2001 coming assume the duties of military assistance to secretary rumsfeld and worked daily with the secretary for the next five and a half years, and then upon retirement from the army continued at the pentagon is deputy assistant secretary of defense, homeland defense, and america security affairs but please join me in welcoming steve bucci. [applause] >> let me add my welcome to all of
and of using your tax dollars. hooking people up who did not qualify for this government program. dagen: did they bother to check? talking about the cell carriers and skip the charge cards, use twitter, the new deal that will let you tweak your payments. connell: that sounds a little dangerous. we have neil cavuto talking about the state of the union. with nicole petallides at the stock exchange and stocks, good morning. nicole: we are taking a look at market, 13,999 and change and 14,000 on the dow jones industrials and certainly have a lot of winners to speak of which we will get to in a moment and the tech having nasdaq trying to squeeze out a gain here, the s&p sitting well above the 1500 mark. traders thought there would be a pullback, can't predict one of those because the trend remains to the upside and as we continue to have higher lows and higher highs, and at the same time nervous to go longer on this market because it is up so far so fast and talk about names that are helping the dow long, retail index, bank index, bank of america, travelers, j. p. morgan, american express are a f
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